Love Notes

While Americans likely began exchanging handmade valentines in the 17th century, the first mass-produced cards date to the 1840s. The Greeting Card Association estimates that 1 billion cards are sent each year worldwide today and that more than half of Americans purchase at least one card, making Valentine’s Day the biggest greeting card holiday in the U.S. after Christmas.

<3 U

According to a survey by American Express, 56 percent of Americans plan on taking a more digital approach to sending their declarations of love this year. Out of that group, 29 percent say they’ll text sweet nothings and another 29 percent say they’ll post on Facebook. Twenty-three percent will send a naughty-or-nice email and 20 percent will mail a loving e-card. We just hope that e-card doesn’t sing.

Sweet Romance

The National Confectioners Association reports that Valentine’s Day candy adds up to a sweet billion dollars in sales each year. Nearly three-quarters of that money is spent on chocolate, which has been lauded as an aphrodisiac since the 15th century. Candy hearts are a hit too, of course: Eight billion were made in 2009, and if you were to line up all those little candies, then the distance would reach from Italy to Arizona 20 times.

Hey, Big Spender

While the average consumer spends about $130 on Valentine’s Day gifts, meals and entertainment, men consistently dole out double what women typically pay, offering up about $287, compared to women’s $164. Women and men are pretty much aligned in their giving and receiving this year, in terms of quantity. Five in 10 women (51 percent) are likely to gift a meal or tickets and four in ten men (41 percent) will give jewelry and flowers.

Wine & Dine

Speaking of meals—the National Restaurant Association expects one quarter of American adults to dine out on Valentine’s Day, making it the second busiest holiday for restaurants next to Mother’s Day. Diners are expected to fork over an estimated $3.9 billion on romantic meals alone, with meal price averaging $142.11, not to mention the bound-to-be-extravagant gifts. What happened to “It’s the thought that counts”?

What a Smooch

On Valentine’s Day in 2011, 14 couples gathered in Thailand to compete for the world record of longest kiss, previously set at 32 hours. Rules dictated that contestants couldn’t sit, sleep or separate, and one of them fainted just a half-hour into the feat. The winning couple lasted 46 hours, 24 minutes and 9 seconds, earning themselves a diamond ring and $3,200—in addition to bragging rights

Source:  http://glo.msn.com/relationships/fun-facts-about-valentines-day-7866.gallery?photoId=137604&ocid=twtr-utweet

 

 

 

Love Notes

While Americans likely began exchanging handmade valentines in the 17th century, the first mass-produced cards date to the 1840s. The Greeting Card Association estimates that 1 billion cards are sent each year worldwide today and that more than half of Americans purchase at least one card, making Valentine’s Day the biggest greeting card holiday in the U.S. after Christmas.

<3 U

According to a survey by American Express, 56 percent of Americans plan on taking a more digital approach to sending their declarations of love this year. Out of that group, 29 percent say they’ll text sweet nothings and another 29 percent say they’ll post on Facebook. Twenty-three percent will send a naughty-or-nice email and 20 percent will mail a loving e-card. We just hope that e-card doesn’t sing.

Sweet Romance

The National Confectioners Association reports that Valentine’s Day candy adds up to a sweet billion dollars in sales each year. Nearly three-quarters of that money is spent on chocolate, which has been lauded as an aphrodisiac since the 15th century. Candy hearts are a hit too, of course: Eight billion were made in 2009, and if you were to line up all those little candies, then the distance would reach from Italy to Arizona 20 times.

Hey, Big Spender

While the average consumer spends about $130 on Valentine’s Day gifts, meals and entertainment, men consistently dole out double what women typically pay, offering up about $287, compared to women’s $164. Women and men are pretty much aligned in their giving and receiving this year, in terms of quantity. Five in 10 women (51 percent) are likely to gift a meal or tickets and four in ten men (41 percent) will give jewelry and flowers.

Wine & Dine

Speaking of meals—the National Restaurant Association expects one quarter of American adults to dine out on Valentine’s Day, making it the second busiest holiday for restaurants next to Mother’s Day. Diners are expected to fork over an estimated $3.9 billion on romantic meals alone, with meal price averaging $142.11, not to mention the bound-to-be-extravagant gifts. What happened to “It’s the thought that counts”?

What a Smooch

On Valentine’s Day in 2011, 14 couples gathered in Thailand to compete for the world record of longest kiss, previously set at 32 hours. Rules dictated that contestants couldn’t sit, sleep or separate, and one of them fainted just a half-hour into the feat. The winning couple lasted 46 hours, 24 minutes and 9 seconds, earning themselves a diamond ring and $3,200—in addition to bragging rights

Source:  http://glo.msn.com/relationships/fun-facts-about-valentines-day-7866.gallery?photoId=137604&ocid=twtr-utweet

 

 

 

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